Burntisland

Opened: 17th September, 1847.
Closed: 1st June, 1890.

The original station at Burntisland was 34½ miles from Hilton Junction and 36 miles from Tayport. The station was adjacent to the pier from which train-ferries crossed the Firth of Forth to Granton for Edinburgh. With the opening of the Forth Bridge, the associated Aberdour Line and a new through station on 1st June, 1890, the old Burntisland terminus became redundant and was closed. The docks at Burntisland were progressively enlarged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries to cater for the export of coal, though coal-exports ceased during the 1950s. Later, they were used for the import of bauxite for Burntisland Aluminium Works.


Headed by English Electric Type 4 (Class 40) No. 40 060, an Edinburgh to Aberdeen train passes Burntisland in July 1979. From 1980 to 1988 I lived in Burntisland, and these big beasts used to pass the bottom of the garden several times-a-day. My family's house was directly behind the locomotive, adjacent to the white-harled houses. The English Electric Type 4 weighed 133 tons in working order, and they were the cause of many jumping needles on my hi-fi. I wonder if they would have had the same effect on CDs? That's probably irrelevant now as I generally set my computer's music-player to random-play! [Alan Rintoul]

Kinghorn

Opened: 17th September, 1847.

Kinghorn Station is 2¼ miles from Burntisland, 32¼ miles from Hilton Junction and 33¾ miles from Tayport. The station has two platforms and retains its original station building on the 'Down' platform. There was a goods shed and goods yard on the 'Down' side at the north end of the station, along with a connection to the Binnend Oil Works Railway. The goods shed was demolished fairly recently.

Wikipedia page.


Ex-LNER Class D49/1 4-4-0 No. 62713 Aberdeenshire approaches Kinghorn with a stopping train from Thornton Junction to Edinburgh Waverley on 30th July, 1955. [Adam Arnott]

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Edinburgh

Kirkcaldy

Opened: 17th September, 1847.

Kirkcaldy Station is located 5¾ miles from Burntisland, 28¾ miles from Hilton Junction and 30¼ miles from Tayport. The station originally had two through platforms, and a bay at the south end on the 'up' side. There were also goods sheds to the north of the station on the 'up' side, and a large goods yard on the 'down' side. Only the two through platforms remain, along with the 'down' loop and a short siding to the north of the station.

Wikipedia page.


Ex-Great North of Scotland Railway Class R (LNER Class G10) 0-4-4T No. 6889 shunts the 'up' goods yard at Kirkcaldy Station on 28th August, 1937. [Eric Lomax]

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Edinburgh

Thornton Junction

Opened: 17th September, 1847.
Closed: 6th October, 1969.

Thornton Junction Station was located 10½ miles from Burntisland, 24 miles from Hilton Junction and 25½ miles from Tayport. From here, a branch of the Edinburgh & Northern Railway ran west to Dunfermline Upper Station, the Leven Railway ran north-east to Leven, and the Wemyss and Buckhaven Railway ran south-east towards Buckhaven. A short distance to the south of the station, a direct connection between the Wemyss & Buckhaven Railway and the Dunfermline Branch passed beneath the main line. The platforms and buildings suffered from subsidence due to undermining, which necessitated rebuilding of the station circa 1920. Despite having been a busy and important junction with frequent train services until its closure, Thornton Junction was closed in October 1969, and nothing now remains to indicate that a station ever existed there. It has been replaced by the inappropriately-named and rather less impressive Glenrothes with Thornton Station which opened on 11th May, 1992, around ¾-of-a-mile to the west on the Dunfermline Branch.


Ex-North British Railway Class K (LNER Class D34) 4-4-0 No. 62467 Glenfinnan stands at the Methil Branch platform at Thornton Junction Station with the 2.40pm Thornton Junction to Methil train on 7th January, 1955. [W.A.C. Smith]

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